The Best Shakshuka Recipe • Happy Kitchen (2024)

Foolproof Shakshuka Recipe: Eggs poached in spicy tomato-based veggie stew, baked to perfection, garnished with fresh herbs and served with crusty bread. Flavorsome, nourishing and healthy one-pot breakfast or dinner meal you will make over and over again!

The Best Shakshuka Recipe • Happy Kitchen (1)

Jump to Recipe

Shakshuka is my go-to one pan dish that I’ve been cooking for years, so it’s time to post my favorite shakshuka recipe on my blog. It’s so incredibly versatile it can be your go-to breakfast, lunch and dinner. But please keep shakshuka in mind when you plan a lazy weekend brunch! You won’t be disappointed, guaranteed.

There is hardly ever something as simple and yet as delicious as shakshuka. Eggs poached in spicy tomato-based veggie stew, baked to perfection and garnished with fresh herbs. Bread is a must for dipping in the sauce and runny yolks. Sometimes it is served in a pita.

Shakshuka originated in North Africa, namely Tunisia, and it became insanely popular all around the Middle East, especially in Israel.

Interestingly, the word “shakshuka” means “a mixture” in Arabic slang and that is for a reason. You can only guess how many variations of shakshuka are out there and which one is the most authentic.

The Best Shakshuka Recipe • Happy Kitchen (2)

We must thankYotam Ottolenghi, a brilliant British chef and food writer, for popularizing shakshuka and other Middle Easter staple food like tahini, za’atar and harissa, to name just a few, into the Western world.

His cookbook Jerusalem is an absolute must read for you if you like Middle Eastern food. Another one of his cookbooks, Plenty, is entirely dedicated to vegetable dishes, so make sure to check it out as well.

Shakshuka might sound exotic but there is nothing easier than eggs, onions, diced tomatoes and a few spices. That is the reason shakshuka became popular in the Western world. Isn’t it a perfect meal if it’s easy, quick, cheap and healthy and works equally well for breakfast as well as it does for dinner?

This simple dish is nourishing, comforting and just perfect for any occasion!

The Best Shakshuka Recipe • Happy Kitchen (3)

How to Make Shakshuka?

The best thing about shakshuka is that you can customize it as you wish. However, there are a few ingredients that are necessary:

  • Aromatics (onions and garlic)
  • Spices

I like to use smoked paprika, cumin, coriander and mild red chili. You can experiment with adding Ras el Hanout, cayenne, caraway or maybe harissa paste.

  • Tomatoes

You can use any tomatoes you have on hand: canned whole, canned diced, fresh, cherry, peeled, with skin on, pureed or cut in big chunks. Just make sure they are ripe and not watery.

  • Eggs
  • Garnishes

Use herbs like basil, parsley, cilantro or mint. Whatever you prefer.

Here is how to make shakshuka:

Sautée chopped onions and minced garlic until translucent, add spices and diced fresh or canned tomatoes. Cook until the liquid is reduced.

Make “wells” in the tomato stew and carefully break the eggs directly into them. Spoon a bit of sauce over egg whites to make them set faster.

The Best Shakshuka Recipe • Happy Kitchen (4)

Put the skillet under the broiler for just a few minutes, until egg whites are set but yolks are still runny.

Another option would be to cover the skillet with a lid and continue cooking shakshuka on the stove, reducing the heat to medium-low. Let it cook for no more than 10 minutes if you want your yolks to be runny.

Garnish with fresh basil leaves and/or other toppings (chopped parsley, mint, cilantro, crumbled feta, harissa, hot sauce, etc). Serve with warm pita or crusty bread. Enjoy!

Make sure you are using an oven-safe skillet for your shakshuka if you choose to broil it. Cast iron pan would be a great option.

The Best Shakshuka Recipe • Happy Kitchen (5)

What are different variations of shakshuka?

  • My favorite late-summer-inspired variation is tomato eggplant shakshuka. Just add diced eggplants together with tomatoes to the pan in the basic recipe above. It tastes delicious and adds a bit of protein to the dish making it more suitable for a light dinner meal.
  • Another variation is spring green shakshuka. Instead of all the greens that I used for this recipe you can just use lots of spinach.
  • One of the most common variations is the addition of red or green bell peppers.
  • Experimenting with other veggies like zucchini and squash sounds great too.
  • Shakshuka pizza is a bomb! Just reserve a bit of sauce, spread it over pizza crust and top with eggs.
  • Add crumbled feta cheese on top of shakshuka for a nice tangy note.
  • Mexishuka with quinoa and black beans is something worth trying for sure!
  • Serve shakshuka over HUMMUS for a mind-blowing Middle Eastern experience.

The Best Shakshuka Recipe • Happy Kitchen (6)

How to Serve Shakshuka?

Traditionally shakshuka is a breakfast dish that is served along with warm pita bread. Any other crusty bread would be OK too.

The Best Shakshuka Recipe • Happy Kitchen (7)

If you serve shakshuka for dinner or brunch (my favorite way), make sure to include a few Middle Eastern appetizers as well as pita bread for the most authentic experience. You can check The Middle Eastern Small Plates, an e-book written by Ksenia Prints, that features a great collection of the best Middle Eastern vegetarian appetizers and finger food. Get a 15% discount with the promo code #HAPPYKITCHENROCKSLOVE when making a payment!

Other must-try Middle Eastern dishes to serve with shakshuka include but are not limited to roasted beetroot hummus with pita chips, pita pockets with roasted veggies and hummus, crispy baked falafel with hazelnuts and creamy lemon mint sauce, to name just a few.

It pairs great with a glass of refreshing Ayran (yogurt drink).

Here is my favorite shakshuka recipe for you. Feel free to adjust it to your liking!

The Best Shakshuka Recipe • Happy Kitchen (8)

Print

5 from 2 votes

The Best Shakshuka Recipe

Foolproof Shakshuka Recipe: Eggs poached in spicy tomato-based veggie stew, baked to perfection, garnished with fresh herbs and served with crusty bread. Flavorsome, nourishing and healthy one-pot breakfast or dinner meal you will make over and over again!

Course Breakfast, Main Dish

Cuisine Middle Eastern

Prep Time 10 minutes minutes

Cook Time 20 minutes minutes

Total Time 30 minutes minutes

Servings 4 servings

Calories 203kcal

Author Elena Szeliga

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 yellow onion chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic minced
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1 mild red chili pepper
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 1 eggplant diced
  • 5-6 ripe tomatoes diced or two 14 oz (400 g) cans diced tomatoes
  • 4 eggs
  • Fresh basil leaves, to garnish
  • Topping options: chopped parsley, mint, cilantro, crumbled feta, harissa, hot sauce (optional)
  • Pita or crusty bread, to serve

Instructions

  • Preheat the broiler to its highest possible temperature. In a large oven-proof skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Sautée chopped onions and minced garlic until translucent. Add spices, salt and pepper and stir to coat. Add diced fresh or canned tomatoes and diced eggplant. Cook until the liquid is reduced.

  • Make "wells" in the tomato stew and carefully break the eggs directly into them. Spoon a bit of sauce over egg whites to make them set faster. Put the skillet under the broiler for just a few minutes, until egg whites are set but yolks are still runny.

  • Another option would be to cover the skillet with a lid and continue cooking shakshuka on the stove, reducing the heat to medium-low. Let it cook for no more than 10 minutes if you want your yolks to be runny. Garnish with fresh basil leaves and/or other suggested toppings. Serve with warm pita or crusty bread. Enjoy!

Notes

Traditionally shakshuka is a breakfast dish that is served along with warm pita bread. Any other crusty bread would be OK too.

Store leftovers in the fridge for up to 2 days.

Nutrition

Calories: 203kcal | Carbohydrates: 17g | Protein: 8g | Fat: 11g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Cholesterol: 163mg | Sodium: 76mg | Potassium: 793mg | Fiber: 6g | Sugar: 10g | Vitamin A: 1900IU | Vitamin C: 42.5mg | Calcium: 65mg | Iron: 2.1mg

Tried this recipe?Follow @happykitchen.rocks on Instagram and show me the recipes you are making from my blog using the hashtag #happykitchenrocks!

Other Breakfast Recipes You’ll Love:

  • Muesli Recipe: A Healthy and Delicious Breakfast Idea
  • Healthier Brioche French Toast
  • How to Make a Smoothie Bowl
  • Blueberry Ricotta Pancakes
The Best Shakshuka Recipe • Happy Kitchen (2024)

FAQs

Is shakshuka Israeli or Palestinian? ›

Even though many people today associate shakshuka with Israel, it actually originated in North Africa and the Ottoman Empire: the only reason shakshuka is eaten in Israel is because North African Jewish immigrants brought it there. This brings us to a contentious topic: food appropriation.

What is traditionally served with shakshuka? ›

Shakshuka is a classic North African and Middle Eastern breakfast dish. This recipe is simple and satisfying, featuring eggs poached in a bell pepper and tomato sauce. Serve it with pita or crusty bread for breakfast or brunch...or dinner!

What country is known for shakshuka? ›

Shakshuka is a simple dish made of gently poached eggs in a delicious chunky tomato and bell pepper sauce. Said to have originated in Tunisia, this breakfast recipe is popular in many parts of North Africa and the Middle East. It is so satisfying, you can serve it for breakfast, lunch, or dinner.

Can you wear jeans in Israel? ›

Showing your stomach is not a big deal in cities like Haifa or Tel Aviv. Also, very few Israeli women wear shorts! Even though it is VERY hot in Israel, wear pants and get used to it. Jeans, stretch, or wide legged pants – you can buy these for basically 5 American dollars in most places in Israel.

Does Japan support Israel or Palestine? ›

General. Japan supports a two-state solution whereby Israel and a future independent Palestinian state live side by side in peace and security.

How do you not overcook eggs in shakshuka? ›

After breaking the eggs into the sauce, gently spoon some of the sauce over just the whites. This helps the whites cook faster so they set before the yolks overcook. Cover and rotate. Covering the skillet allows the eggs to steam-cook, which moves things along.

Do you eat shakshuka in a bowl or plate? ›

Connoisseurs insist shakshuka should be eaten from the pan.

Can you eat shakshuka everyday? ›

As often as possible but because it's time consuming, more often on weekends or for supper (eggs, in general, are common supper choice). Having a surplus of ripe tomatoes at hand is also a factor.

What kind of bread to eat with shakshuka? ›

Bread or pita bread.

For a very western version, you'll want to make a classic no-knead bread (super easy!) for the occasion. But for a Middle Eastern version like the one I'm suggesting here, you'll swap white bread with pita bread!

Do you eat shakshuka with spoon or fork? ›

It's a quick, flavourful, and satisfying meal, especially after a long day. Also, it is perfectly acceptable to eat shakshuka straight out of the pan, using wedges of pita bread as your spoon. Of course, if you prefer a knife and fork, spoon the eggs with their sauce over lightly toasted bread.

What religion is shakshuka? ›

In Jewish culture, a large batch of tomato stew is made for the Sabbath dinner and the leftovers used the following morning to make a breakfast shakshouka with eggs.

Are Turkish eggs the same as shakshuka? ›

Turkish menemen is very similar to shakshuka, but there's a lesser-known Turkish eggs recipe that's incredibly delicious too. This, called cilbir, involves poaching eggs, then laying them on a swirl of garlic-infused yoghurt, topping with a nutty chilli butter and fresh dill fronds.

What does shakshuka mean in english? ›

shakshouka, a Maghrebi (North African) dish, popular throughout the region, featuring poached eggs in a spicy tomato sauce, seasoned with peppers, onion, garlic, and various spices. The word shakshouka comes from Maghrebi Arabic dialect and means “mixed.”

What's the difference between eggs in purgatory and shakshuka? ›

The main difference between shakshuka and eggs in purgatory is the spices and herbs. Skakshuka features Middle Eastern spices, such as cumin and sweet paprika. Eggs in purgatory does not include these spices and uses Italian herbs, such as oregano and basil.

Is shakshuka Palestinian food? ›

Palestinian food is a rich and flavorful cuisine that reflects the country's diverse cultural influences. Traditional dishes include musakhan, a roasted chicken and sumac dish served on flatbread, and maqluba, a layered rice and vegetable dish. Other popular dishes include falafel, hummus, and shakshuka.

Is shakshuka Israeli? ›

Like all Israeli cuisine, Shakshuka has evolved over time, resulting in numerous recipes with varying ingredients, morphing into a dish that reflects the individual's personal preferences, and growing into a meal served for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

What is Palestine's national dish? ›

Introduction. Musakhan the national dish of Palestine, is a traditional dish composed of roasted chicken that is baked with onions, spices and fried pines nuts, then served on Taboon bread. It is simple to make and even more delicious to eat–making it one of the most popular Arabic Palestinian dishes.

Did Israel invent shakshuka? ›

Originally coming from countries like Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, Algeria and Morocco it became popular in Israel from the Tunisian Jews. Some people believe the dish was invented in the Ottoman Empire and spread throughout the Middle East – often served with a spicy sausage.

References

Top Articles
Latest Posts
Article information

Author: Pres. Carey Rath

Last Updated:

Views: 6247

Rating: 4 / 5 (61 voted)

Reviews: 92% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Pres. Carey Rath

Birthday: 1997-03-06

Address: 14955 Ledner Trail, East Rodrickfort, NE 85127-8369

Phone: +18682428114917

Job: National Technology Representative

Hobby: Sand art, Drama, Web surfing, Cycling, Brazilian jiu-jitsu, Leather crafting, Creative writing

Introduction: My name is Pres. Carey Rath, I am a faithful, funny, vast, joyous, lively, brave, glamorous person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.